Interesting Moss Growth…1 year later

Nature Walks

This picture was taken during the heart of the most recent 2019/2020 winter in the same place as the Moss Post I made a while back. It’s so cool how everyone in this area leaves the moss formation alone and lets it grow in this way. I love looking at it; the moss looks like tiny islands in the sand, or like grassy hills.

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It was much sunnier when I took the more recent pictures!

Last Year (overcast weather):

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Sassafras Leaves

Nature Walks

The sassafras tree is very interesting, for it produces multiple types of leaves on the same tree. Each leave can have one, two, or three lobes. They are also slightly fuzzy. The roots were an important item for trade between early America and the old world because they made a tasty drink, and the leaves are used in some styles of cooking, though I have no recipes to offer.

Curly Winter Grass Fronds

Gardening

This is the seedhead of a very hardy grass that we call elephant grass here. It’s a bit of a pest, in my opinion, because the leaves are sharp (no good for weaving- you’ll cut up your hands) and the roots are so strong it’s impossible to pull up. You’ll only hurt yourself if you try. Perhaps it’s named elephant grass because you’d need the strength of an elephant to move it? It grows about 5 feet tall and provides good privacy and can withstand freezing temperatures, drought, and seasonal flooding and doesn’t take much effort to maintain, but I still don’t like finding seedlings of it in my garden. Even when the plant is small, it is incredibly difficult to pull up. A single plant with just a few blades of the sharp grass takes all my strength to remove.

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In the winter, when everything else has died back, it’s rather pretty to look at. I took this photo earlier this month, and since then, a neighbor’s cat has moved into the grass and made it her home, so I don’t disturb that area right now.