Crazy Onion Against the Sky

Gardening

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I love perennial walking onions. Mine are purple. I traded for some a while back, then planted a couple of the ping pong-sized onion-lets, and cultivated them. It took a few years, but it paid off! I can harvest the tiny onion-lets for seasoning meals. They’ll be ready soon!

Chive Blossom Butter

Cooking and Household, Gardening

When the purple chives bloom, I love harvesting the flowers to make chive blossom butter. A handful of chive flowers, their green parts removed and their flowers separated into little bits, plus a softened stick of butter, gently folded together while taking care not to crush the flowers. Plop the butter mixture onto some wax paper, form a stick, then chill until solid again. Delicious on homemade bread!

Bee Balm Tea

Cooking and Household, Gardening

Mybee balm, which I am so happy is vigorously growing, was shading out another plant, so I had to pull a small amount of it to let this plant grow, too. I made the bee balm leaves into a tea. I got the seeds here (Baker Creek Perennial Bee Balm Spielarten Mix) and they have about a year of growth now. I can’t wait until they finally bloom!

P1040640 - CopyBee balm tea has a refreshing, gentle lemon flavor and is the lightest green possible without being totally clear. If I were to make it into a tea blend, I would make sure that the other ingredients impart some amount of color to help me determine when the tea is properly steeped.

Radishes: from Seedling to Snacking!

Gardening

Last fall, I was very lucky to wander into the dollar store just when the clearance seeds were running. I don’t like to purchase dollar store seeds at full price because they just don’t germinate reliably and there are so few seeds per packet, but at pennies, what’s the harm in trying it? I purchased spinach, which I have already blogged about here, and a packet of radish mix.

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I planted them in a row. After thinning them, I put the radish thinnings into a recipe! My goal is to waste as little as possible.

The radishes were ready for harvest in just a month. Here they are, sitting on top of my white yarrow plant:

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I confess, they did not make it into a dinner. I washed them off and had them as a snack that afternoon. They were so tasty and zesty! (And I’m the only one in the household who likes them.)

Wild Violets Back for Another Year

Gardening

This photo was taken a little while ago. Now, the plants are bushy and about 1 foot tall!

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When I first started this garden, I was pleased to see the little wild violets survive tilling and re-establish themselves in the new garden bed. I think those plants could survive the end of the world.  They have yummy leaves and little flowers that have sweet-tasting centers, and both parts sometimes go in my salads and other recipes. Euell Gibbons claims they are high in vitamins.

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To ensure that I have wild violets in my garden every year, I leave a minimum of 2/3 the flowers I see. The flowers hide under leaves, so I know I’m leaving more of that. I take a couple flowers and leaves from all over the garden to ensure I don’t wipe out any particular plant. This year, I only made a few salads including violets in hopes of making the plants even stronger and more numerous next year.